Category Archives: disability

Sins Invalid 2009 Performance Available for Rent!

Dual Power has a production team and an artist team. It’s a small but growing group of creatives who are working to produce fantastic projects.

PRODUCTION FAMILY:

basil shadid | owner, pancreatitis producer
Basil was the Post-Coordinator on the Academy Award nominated documentary Iraq In Fragments. He has been working in film since 2003. Based in Seattle, information pills Washington, infection Basil works internationally. Previous projects have taken him through Asia, the Middle East, Europe, North America and South America. He has also traveled thousands of miles on freight trains throughout the US. His Masters in Mental Health Counseling, background in popular education, yearning for adventure, and years of experience in production give him a unique perspective on story.

billie rain | owner, producer, director
billie is a disabled writer, activist and filmmaker. years of chronic illness and a rare tumor condition have given hir an amazing sense of groundedness, connection and self-advocacy that fuel hir passion to bring truth, in all it’s pain and glory, to audiences everywhere. billie is the author of fix this mess and  screenwriter’s toolkit. billie is the director of heart breaks open, R/EVOLVE, and Love Like A Heart Attack.

ponyboy | owner, producer
Ponyboy is a queer mixed-race, mixed-gendered artist, artist, musician, activist & writer living in Seattle who has worked with arts- & youth-focused organizations for more than 10 years. S/he is currently on staff at The Vera Project, is co-executive producer at Dual Power Productions, was an advisor/staff member of every HomoAGoGo (a national queer arts & music festival), is on the advisory team for Queer Youth Space & Reteaching Gender & Sexuality, & plays music as often as possible given a busy schedule. Ponyboy is a believer in social justice & radical politics, has a deep love of photography, speaks French, & is an (ex-)Midwesterner who likes to spout lots of facts about Ohio.

ASSOCIATE ARTISTS:

susan abod | director
Dual Power Projects:  Director of ‘Homesick‘; Director of ‘Funny, You Don’t Look Sick
Before she became ill, Susan was a professional singer, songwriter, recording artist, teacher and performer. Susan has been documenting CFIDS and MCS for close to two decades. Her first film, Funny, You Don’t Look Sick: An Autobiography of an Illness painted an intimate portrait of her struggle to live with these debilitating conditions. Funny You Don’t Look Sick premiered at the Museum of Fine Arts in 1995, and was a Merit Award winner at the 2005 SUPERFEST International Disability Film Festival. It has been screened internationally and can be found in doctor’s and lawyer’s offices, university and public libraries, medical classrooms, centers for independent living, support groups and in peoples’ homes all over the world.

alex berry | director
Dual Power Projects: Director of ‘Drag Becomes Him
Alex Berry is a filmmaker living in Seattle. In addition to the original Drag Becomes Him web mini-series, Berry has made several music videos, as well as online commercials for local companies, fashion designers, and dance clubs. His work, described as “engrossing” and “beautifully filmed,” has also appeared on The Huffington Post, NewNowNext, and City Arts.

maximillian davis | director
Dual Power Projects: Director of ‘drunk.naked.love‘; Lead Actor in ‘Heart Breaks Open‘; Lead Actor in ‘R/EVOLVE
Maximillian Davis is an associate artist with Dual Power Productions. With Davis in the role of ‘Jesus’, the company’s first feature Heart Breaks Open screened in international film festivals in Asia, Europe, Africa, and North America and was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at the Los Angeles Asian American Film Festival. His second feature-length collaboration with the company was as ‘Lincoln’ in the film R/Evolve. The film received international recognition playing festivals on four continents, and received a nomination for best narrative feature at the KASHISH Mumbai Queer Film Festival. He has also served as a director and producer on the company’s acclaimed web series Drunk.Naked.Love. Power comes from representation. Max is thrilled to be creating work with a company that uses this tenet as guide when the workday starts.

shann thomas | director
Dual Power Projects: Director of ‘Let Me In‘ by Orbé Orbé
Shann Thomas is a filmmaker, multimedia artist and educator born and raised in the Pacific Northwest. Shann has a passion for making filmmaking more inclusive, joyful, full of humor and emoticons.  Let Me In is her directorial debut.

sins invalid | artists collective
Dual Power Projects: Creator of ‘Sins Invalid’ Performances
Sins Invalid is a disability justice based performance project that incubates and celebrates artists with disabilities, centralizing artists of color and queer and gender-variant artists as communities who have been historically marginalized. Our performance work explores the themes of sexuality, embodiment and the disabled body.

suki valentine | author
Dual Power Projects: Author of ‘My Sister’s Shadow
Suki Valentine is a down-to-earth New Yorker with nothing to hide and a lot to give. Even when traveling far and wide, she wants the world to know that her heart belongs to New Jersey. My Sister’s Shadow is her first book.
Sins09Click here to watch the 2009 Sins Invalid Performance online. 

Sins Invalid is a disability justice based performance project that incubates and celebrates artists with disabilities, cialis centralizing artists of color and queer and gender-variant artists as communities who have been historically marginalized. Our performance work explores the themes of sexuality, embodiment and the disabled body.

Conceived and led by disabled people of color, we develop and present cutting-edge work where paradigms of “normal” and “sexy” are challenged, offering instead a vision of beauty and sexuality inclusive of all individuals and communities. We define disability broadly to include people with physical impairments, people who belong to a sensory minority, people with emotional disabilities, people with cognitive challenges, and those with chronic/severe illness. We understand the experience of disability to occur within any and all walks of life, with deeply felt connections to all communities impacted by the medicalization of their bodies, including trans, gender variant and intersex people, and others whose bodies do not conform to our culture(s)’ notions of “normal” or “functional.”

Watch our 2009 Annual Performance as we welcome you to our queendom/ kingdom/ queerdom /multi-bodied universe…

Artists include:

  • PATRICIA BERNE
  • JOHN BENSON
  • RALPH DICKINSON
  • MAT FRASER
  • TODD HERMAN
  • ANTOINE-DEVINCI HUNTER
  • LEAH LAKSHMI PIEPZNA-SAMARASINHA
  • NOMY LAMM
  • LEROY F. MOORE JR.
  • AURORA LEVINS MORALES
  • CARA PAGE
  • MARIA R. PALACIOS
  • seeley quest

Click here to watch the 2009 Sins Invalid Performance online. 

Learn more: sinsinvalid.org

Watch Now: Funny, You Don't Look Sick

We’re excited to present Susan Abod’s first film about living with Multiple Chemical Sensitivities, nurse “Funny, diagnosis You Don’t Look Sick.” You can now watch it through Video On Demand. It’s also coming soon to DVD through Dual Power Productions.

Funny, migraine You Don’t Look Sick: An Autobiography of an Illness
Produced, Written and Directed by Susan Abod and Lisa Pontoppidan,
1995. Color, 64 mins.

2005 Merit Award Winner
Superfest International Disability Film Festival

This intimate documentary self-portrait is told with humor and compassion. Susan Abod is a woman living with Chronic Fatigue Immune Dysfunction Syndrome (CFIDS) and Multiple Chemical Sensitivities (MCS). Filmed over a period of 18 months in 1994-95, Susan describes in detail the nature of her illness, illustrates her daily routine, and gives us a guided tour of her environmentally “safe” apartment. Comments from Susan’s numerous doctors and a visit with her support group offer further insights in this illuminating, firsthand report on a baffling, twenty-first century disease.

susan abod | director
Before she became ill, Susan was a professional singer, songwriter, recording artist, teacher and performer. Susan has been documenting CFIDS and MCS for close to two decades. Funny, You Don’t Look Sick: An Autobiography of an Illness paints an intimate portrait of her struggle to live with these debilitating conditions. Funny You Don’t Look Sick premiered at the Museum of Fine Arts in 1995, and was a Merit Award winner at the 2005 SUPERFEST International Disability Film Festival. It has been screened internationally and can be found in doctor’s and lawyer’s offices, university and public libraries, medical classrooms, centers for independent living, support groups and in peoples’ homes all over the world.

Screenings: Humor Me! & BED

Humor Me and BED: A Place Called Home will be screening on Wednesday, thumb June 27 at Gallery 1412 in Seattle as part of The Sissy Collective‘s Short Film For Funds event.

Humor Me

Humor Me is a 9-minute documentary short that briefly interviews three sex-workers about a funny and humanizing moment from the job.

BED: A Place Called Home

Billie’s estrogen grows dense tumors in the soft tissues of her body. Her body is filled with tumors that, rx on days, buy information pills like this, make bed a place called home.

About The Sissy Collective (from their website):

We exist for sissies, nerds, geeks, outcasts, wimps, weaklings, survivors, gender deviants, People of Color, queer folks, trans folks, and anyone who has ever felt on the outside or oppressed in their ability to share their art.

We want to create intentional space for people in the arts through regular events in a variety of mediums. We’re working towards creating community that centralizes the marginalized.

We hold ourselves accountable to continually grow, change and evolve in our goals, events, and community building.

Seeking: Director of Accessibility

R/EVOLVE (a new feature film) is starting to crew-up for our summer film shoot in Seattle. We’re creating a new position called the “Director of Accessibility”. This role manages accessibility accommodations on set. Whether that be working with our disabled director or making sure that we’re doing the best we can to manage other accommodations on set. Other crew roles will be announced shortly, sovaldi sale but if you’re interested in working with people with disabilities in film, gynecologist then this might be the perfect role.

Check out the Facebook page (http://www.facebook.com/revolvemovie) and email [email protected] to learn more.

Homesick wins funding!

Homesick completed a successful IndieGoGo campaign and has raised enough money for the next step in our journey to completion. We’re very excited to bring this project to an audience.

HOMESICK needs your help!

Thanks to everyone who participated in the online streaming of the 2008 Sins Invalid performance. We had a successful viewing. Hundreds of people logged on to watch the show and Sins Invalid was able to reach a broader audience. We look forward to more!

Imagine that houses make you sick—dangerously sick. Common products like paint, ailment
carpeting, health system
new building materials and insecticides are poisonous enemies. Your bones ache, sales you’re feverish, you suffer from extreme headaches, disabling fatigue, mental confusion, asthma, nausea and sleeping disorders. The longer you stay in toxic housing, the sicker you get—and the less resources you have to deal with your desperate search for a home. You’re one of the millions of Americans suffering from the silent epidemic of Multiple Chemical Sensitivities (MCS).

Now imagine that you’re an artist, a critically acclaimed filmmaker and singer/songwriter who lives with MCS. Susan Abod is that artist. Susan was on the fast track to musical success when she was blindsided by a diagnosis of MCS at the age of 32. Her award-winning first film, Funny, You Don’t Look Sick: An Autobiography of an Illness (1995, Cinema Guild), has been screened internationally. Ten years in the making, her feature documentary Homesick: Living with Multiple Chemical Sensitivities is the sequel.

To film Homesick, Susan hit the road with her camerawoman, learning how people around the country who live with MCS find safe housing. She interviewed people from all walks of life; their living quarters ranged from a house on stilts to tents and a teepee. Filmed over a period of ten years, the film now includes follow-up interviews with the original subjects. The trailer has been screened at the Santa Fe Film Center and at the Santa Fe Center For Contemporary Art’s Megabytes 4 Festival, and has been viewed over 200,000 times on the Homesick website. Homesick is currently in post-production, with a 64-minute rough cut. We’re almost there, but we need $6,000 to record the soundtrack and complete the post-production for the film. We need your help for Susan to complete her epic journey!

Sins Viewing Success

Thanks to everyone who participated in the online streaming of the 2008 Sins Invalid performance. We had a successful viewing. Hundreds of people logged on to watch the show and Sins Invalid was able to reach a broader audience. We look forward to more!

Sins Invalid VOD – August 6 to 12

Screenwriter’s Toolkit: 101 Writing Exercises is now available for purchase as a book. Written and refined over the past 8 years, tablets Screenwriter’s Toolkit has been taught at UCLA Screenwriter’s Program and has been an active blog with thousands of visitors. There are plenty of resources that will tell you how to write, doctor what to write and how to sell what you’ve written. Screenwriter’s Toolkit: 101 Writing Exercises will help you practice your writing skills. If you’re experiencing writer’s block, seek use the exercises to get your creative juices flowing.

The book is an updated version of the blog exercises. It brings together new work with practiced ideas. Bring it with you and use it to help you practice the Screenwriting craft.

Purchase It!
• Buy it online!
The Sins Invalid Video On Demand Performance came to Dual Power Productions from August 6 to 12, doctor 2011.

Hey crips, queers, artists, activists, allies, kinksters, kids, and creatures!

As part of our work as interns at Sins Invalid in stunningly wheelchair accessible Berkeley, California, my colleague Allegra and I are helping to launch a new web streaming series of Sins Invalid’s Annual shows. The pilot will be launched on the week of August 6th and will remain online until August 12th. Depending on the success of this venture we do plan to continue the series through the fall and winter!

As you may have seen on www.sinsinvalid.org, our website has a wealth of clips from various Sins Invalid performances. However, this impression of Sins as a sort of cabaret is inaccurate, and we want to bring the full arc of the Sins shows to you, starting with the year 2008. We know that you may have been unable to attend shows in the past, and as a wheelchair user I know how inconvenient and painful traveling can be. This is why we’re taking action and getting Sins to you. This is about getting communities together and celebrating the work of Sins Invalid over the years!

Every piece speaks to and touches the last, they writhe and complicate and bless and grow in one another’s grasp. The 2008 show explores the territories of spirituality, the sacrifice and the sacred, as these themes play out in our relationships and over the landscapes of our disabled bodies. The performers are asserting the blessing that is the knowledge of one’s sexiness, agency, vulnerability, messiness, grace, and power, and if that’s a sin too, then so be it!

This will be a pay per view, sliding scale donation event of anywhere between $0-$100. We are a fiscally sponsored organization; check out the link to the event page to our sponsor’s website where you can make paypal donations. We are making a suggested donation of $10 but no one will be refused the opportunity to view the show for lack of funds.

And the bonus! There will be a discussion packet sent to any interested parties and a live Q & A with directors Patty Berne and Leroy Moore!

This event comes to you through a partnership with Dual Power Productions and is co-sponsored by Fierce Bodies. We hope you’ll check out their sites and support their work!

To participate in bringing a viewing party to your home or group, email [email protected], Allegra Stout: [email protected], Patty Berne: [email protected]?, or myself, Beast Von Fancy: [email protected]!

This is a preliminary event invitation. More details will be released as we create them. Just drop me a line or RSVP to this event to let me know that you’re interested.

Fierce Blessings,
Beast

billie reads @ Cripping Culture

AccessibilityFlyer

What:
this multimedia workshop was part presentation, approved part brainstorm session.

billie rain presented hir experiences and thoughts as a disabled collaborative filmmaker and disability justice activist. this will be a jumping off point for a discussion on issues facing disabled filmmakers and artists. specifically we will be discussing how access issues can be proactively confronted in the arts.

Who is billie rain:
billie is a disabled writer, activist and filmmaker. years of chronic illness and a rare tumor condition have given hir an amazing sense of groundedness, connection and self-advocacy that fuel hir passion to bring truth, in all it’s pain and glory, to audiences everywhere.

billie’s filmography:

  • To Be A Heart (Short) – 2006
  • Humor Me (Short) – 2010
  • Heart Breaks Open (Feature) – 2011
  • R/EVOLVE (Feature) – 2013
  • Love Like A Heart Attack (Feature) – Forthcoming

billie’s website:
http://www.billierain.com

Click to download the notes from billie’s presentation:
Accessibility In The Arts.PDF
billie will be reading from Fierce Bodies at:
Cripping Culture
A live poetry slam and art show

Thursday, hospital
May 26
6:30 to 8:30pm

Parnassus Cafe
Seattle, WA

3 Steps to Organizing A Fragrance Free Event

Want to make your event accessible to people with chemical and fragrance sensitivities? Here are three steps to making that happen.

STEP 1: ACCESSIBILITY MEASURES

Decide what accessibility measures you want to provide. Know that your choice will have an impact on all attendees. Be honest with yourself and your attendees. Choose the option you can commit to.

When deciding on accessibility measures, pills two things to consider are people and the environment.

You’ll be asking people to change their habits and products. What limitations do you put on smoking? What kinds of personal care products can you limit at the event? This process can be intimate. Be prepped to offer websites and articles as resources.

Environmental factors in an event space include air quality and building materials. Air quality refers to the amount of pollutants in the air. Do people smoke in the space? Was it used for events that used toxic supplies (painting, pharm silk screening, etc)? Do those chemicals still linger?

Assessing building materials refers to accessibility regarding the structure of the event space. Has it been painted recently? Does it have new materials that are still outgassing?

Here are three options for event accessibility. They are meant as helpful choices that make it easier for you to implement.

OPTION A – MOST ACCESSIBLE
• No Smoking at or near the event space throughout the entire event
• Ask participants to not wear clothes that have been smoked in
• No colognes, perfumes or essential oils
• Ask participants to wear clothes that have not been exposed to perfumes, colognes or scented oils, laundry detergents or fabric softeners
• Ask participants to refrain from using scented body and haircare products before or during the event.
• Fragrance free seating or space set aside
• Air purifiers used to increase air quality
• Building checked for issues like paint and outgassing materials. Other event space chosen if current one has recent chemical use.
• Remove offending chemical materials from space (air fresheners, chemical cleaners)
• Clean with non-toxic cleaning products before event.

OPTION B – MODERATELY ACCESSIBLE
• No Smoking in the event space or within 25 feet of the event entrance
• No cologne or perfume wearing
• Fragrance free seating or space set aside
• Air purifiers used to increase air quality
• Building checked for issues like paint and outgassing materials. Other event space chosen if current one has recent chemical use.
• Remove offending chemical materials from space (air fresheners, chemical cleaners)

OPTION C – LOW ACCESSIBILITY
• No Smoking in the event space or within 25 feet of the event entrance
• No cologne or perfume wearing
• Air purifiers used to increase air quality
• Remove offending chemical materials from space (air fresheners, chemical cleaners)

STEP 2: LET ATTENDEES KNOW

Let your attendees know how accessible the event will be. Your online and offline publicity and marketing materials should communicate expectations to potential participants. Be specific about participant demands so people with fragrance and chemical sensitivities can trust that the organizers have put thought into accessibility.

Here are two sample write-ups.

OPTION A – MOST ACCESSIBLE
To provide a chemical and fragrance free event, we request that participants refrain from the following before or during the event: Smoking; Wearing colognes, perfumes or scented oils; and using chemical based laundry detergents or fabric softeners. We ask participants to wear something that has had limited exposure to the items above.

OPTION B – MODERATE TO LOW ACCESSIBILITY
Please refrain from wearing colognes, perfumes or other scented or chemical products to the event.

STEP 3: ENFORCEMENT PLAN

Create a plan for enforcing accessibility. Please don’t let this task fall on attendees who have chemical or fragrance sensitivities. If you are inviting people with sensitivities to your event, it is important to be assertive and enforce the plan to ensure their safety and health.

This plan should include an effort before and during the event.

Your pre-event effort will include an assessment of the space and the implementation of any changes to the space. Remember to remove chemical materials, add air purifiers and add clear instructions for smokers. If you have created special seating or sections, clearly label them.

Decide what to do if someone breaks the rules. What if someone shows up wearing strongly scented products? What if someone smokes in a non-smoking area? How will you address concerns if they arise? Will people be asked to leave? To change? To wash up?

Knowing your answers in advance will ensure a better response in the moment.

During the event, monitor the smoking areas and any special seating or sections to make sure the plan is still working. Assign an accessibility coordinator who can keep track of these things so it doesn’t get lost in the shuffle.

Enforcement is key to making this plan and your event as accessible as possible.